1. Django Reinhardt was a prodigy at thirteen playing the cafés of Paris. A burn victim at eighteen when he came home from a gig and knocked over a candle in the caravan where he lived with his young wife. The materials for the celluloid-and-paper flowers she made to supplement their income were highly flammable, and the caravan flashed quickly into flame. A small miracle at twenty, when he emerged from a long convalescence after the fire that ruined half his left hand and revealed an improbable new technique: he worked the frets with two fingers and made his own substitutions for the standard major and minor chords. The miracle was that he played better after the fire than before. He carried the fire with him through all the days of his life, in his two curled fingers and in the way he used a match to hold the bridge of his battered guitar up to the proper height.

    — Emily St. John Mandel, from The Lola Quartet

  2. He’d recently come out of rehab for the second time and he felt skinless, his bones exposed to the open air. His hands shook. Every light was too bright. He knew he could repair this awful fragility with a pill or two but that was the point, he’d promised his parents, he was wracked with guilt for how expensive he imagined rehab must be although they kept the numbers from him. “You don’t want to drift through life all addled, Jack,” his mother’s voice as she served him dinner his first night home, breadcrumb-covered casserole in a blue dish from childhood, these impossibly moving small details that kept him perpetually tripped-up and on the edge of tears. In rehab he’d spent a lot of time watching videos and now his thoughts were a fog of old movies.

    — Emily St. John Mandel, from The Lola Quartet

  3. He had two jobs after that. There was the job he did for Eilo, the eight or nine hours he spent at her service. Driving to visit and photograph houses, negotiating with the residents of foreclosed homes, writing up property descriptions at his desk. Eilo liked his work. He neither enjoyed nor particularly disliked the occupation. He wanted only to reach the evening, when the real work began. His secret investigation, the story he was tracking, the focused hours spent waiting for Daniel to appear in the doorway of the police station.

    — Emily St. John Mandel, from The Lola Quartet

  4. The Lola Quartet was playing “Bei Mir Bist Du Schön” for the second time and a pretty girl named Taylor from Choir was singing in her best dusky lounge voice. They were all in love with the music and also a little in love with Taylor, or at least Gavin was and he imagined that everyone around him was caught up in the same dream. And then he caught a flash of white out of the corner of his eye and that was the paper airplane, arcing down through the air to land at his feet. He knew only one person with aim that perfect. He looked up and saw her, Anna standing just beyond the dancers at the edge of the light, and he half-smiled around the mouthpiece at her but she didn’t smile back. There was something urgent in the way she looked at him.

    — Emily St. John Mandel, from The Lola Quartet

  5. A 10 meter high “wall of books” in Amsterdam. (via)

    A 10 meter high “wall of books” in Amsterdam. (via)

  6. From NPR Books. Sigh.

    From NPR Books. Sigh.

  7. iheartclassics:

It’s like Jenga for books!

    iheartclassics:

    It’s like Jenga for books!

  8. Jhumpa Lahiri

    Jhumpa Lahiri

  9. Please take a minute to watch this “book rush” — a scene taken from the novel HOLLYWOOD BOULEVARD by Janyce Stefan-Cole and filmed by Red Cube Pictures.

  10. beverlyealdama:

NEW pins are in the shop :)
(via Read More Books 1 inch button pin by beverlyyy on Etsy)

    beverlyealdama:

    NEW pins are in the shop :)

    (via Read More Books 1 inch button pin by beverlyyy on Etsy)